DVD

Video on Digital Versatile Disc (DVD)
2 discs, one printed: imation DVD-R 4.7GB, the other showing shiny dark surface with rainbow-coloured reflections

Recordable Digital Versatile Discs (DVD-R), showing printed side and recordable side

introduction to DVD transfer

Storing video on optical media became very popular in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, with the Digital Versatile Disc (DVD) being the most flexible and cheapest way to distribute content ranging from movies to video games and data back ups.

To preserve the integrity of the original authored disc, such as its menu structure and other metadata, we would usually create an ISO disc image. This disc image can then be played as the original dvd was intended on any computer and doesn't require a dvd player.

We can also transcode to FFV1 lossless files or 10-bit uncompressed video files in .mkv or .mov containers. We create viewing files as H264 encoded .mp4 files. We can deliver any other digital video files, according to your needs. 

We can provide the appropriately-sized usb media for your files, or use media supplied by you, or deliver your files online. Files delivered on hard drive can be for any operating system MacOS, Windows or GNU/Linux and filesystems (HFS+, NTFS or EXT3).

Due to the complexity of digital video and the varying needs of our clients,  it’s not always appropriate to create fixed prices for our services.  We’ve found that assessing projects prior to confirming costs a more accurate and fair method.

We offer free assessmentsplease contact us to discuss your project.

DVD machines

DVD format variation

cylindrical stack of shiny purple DVD-R discs

Stack of DVD-R discs

3 large silver-coloured computers with DVD-Rs loaded in their open disc drive trays

3 of our Mac Pro machines

2 DVDs with rulers indicating diameter 4¾ inch / 12 cm each

DVD dimensions: 4¾ inch / 12 cm diameter

DVD risks & vulnerabilities

DVD recording history